Do medicines work differently in men and women?







The effectiveness of a medicine depends, among other things, on how quickly it breaks down in the body. In many cases, drugs are broken down by enzymes in the liver, and the level of activity of the genes which control production of these enzymes is often different in men and women. This means that the same dose of a particular meditation will work differently in male and female patients-and may also cause side effects to a greater or lesser extent. Aspirin, for example, has been shown to offer men more protection against heart attacks than it does women in certain circumstances.
                      Gender differences in hormone balance and distribution of fat and muscle tissue can also influence the effectiveness of some medicines. For these reasons, the choice and dosage of drugs will become more gender-specific in future.

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